How Can a Focus on Teacher Well-being in Pre-service Training Promote the Resilience of Primary School Student Teachers?

Sissel Tove Olsen

Abstract

Norwegian teachers are facing increasing challenges with multi-lingualism and multi-culturalism in schools. In addition, Norway faces the challenge of addressing the need to retain novice teachers. In teacher education programmes there is little focus on teacher well-being to assist teachers in understanding and coping with the challenges of a range of schools and teaching contexts. The focus of this paper is on how an induction course on Teacher Well-Being, TWB, infused as part of an exchange programme between one higher education institution, Oslo and Akershus University of Applied Sciences (HIOA) in Norway and three primary schools in South Africa, influence the professional development and resilience of the participating primary school student teachers.  A qualitative research approach was used to capture student perceptions and meaning of their learning and development from the TWB training. The research design was informed by the qualitative reflective research approach as understood by, among others, Alvesson and Skjoldberg.

Keywords

Teacher well-being, resilience, diversity, pre-service training

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References

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Categories: 2017, Articles - JETEN, Urban Education

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