Keynote speaker #1: Hans Henrik Hjermitslev, Denmark

Professional identity
Hans Henrik Hjemitslev will provide a glimpse on the history, function and identity of the Danish welfare professions. The presentation will focus

on the development of the professional identities of public officers working in the social, educational and health sectors of the welfare state and how the establishment of this class of welfare professionals was closely connected to the building of the Danish welfare state after World War II. The identities and ethical values of the professions is associated with ideas of liberal democracy and human rights. However, since the 1980s the welfare professions have been challenged by the principles of new public management and the agenda of the so-called competitive state. Empirically, Hans focuses on Denmark while making a parallel with the history of most welfare states around the globe.

Hopefully we will add material here from the presentation. Feel free to comment and discuss below!



Categories: Conferences, Digital conference 2021

32 replies

  1. Room 15 question: Could you tell us more about the connection between loss of autonomy and social trust in our professions and new management at the one hand and and the role of interprofessional cooperation at the other hand?

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  2. Q3: is interprofrssional cooperation in your curriculum? ==> it is at Karel de Grote University (Antwerp Belgium), but in a limited way (3 EC)

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  3. Room 9: In the Netherlands students may choose for a minor (social work, or education if they are studying social work).
    Men in primary education often put in the spotlight. It’s meant to be nice, but it can be tiring after a while.
    In my school (Leiden), students are evaluated on how well they deal with professionals from outside of the school. It must be offered at some point, but content-wise, I don’t know what it includes.

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  4. We are leading… 🙂 Room 9 Hup Hup!

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  5. The situation is similar in the Scandinavian countries and in the Netherlands. In Sweden pre-school teachers belong to Teacher Education, in Denmark Social Work. “Lektor” – teacher employed by municipality who finances a PhD on the understanding that they come back to work for the municipality. Sweden network meetings for the family of children with difficulties with nurses, social workers etc. In the Netherlands teachers and social workers use different language and find it difficult to work together. In the Netherlands there are “school doctors”, in Sweden “school nurses”. Nurses have more independance in Sweden. There are many subjects that need to be included in teacher education, eg violence in the home, bullying

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  6. How does the history and situation of the welfare professions in Denmark differ from your own country?
    Sweden: Similar Situation
    Germany: After WWII, notions of professional identity (in welfare professions) differed between Western Germany and Easter Germany.

    When and how do schoolteachers in your country cooperate with other welfare professionals (social workers, nurses, social educators, preschool teachers, therapists etc.)?
    German/Sweden/Netherlands: inclusive schools: social workers support individual kids in classrooms
    Denmark: Pedagogues in classrooms (?)

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  7. Room 8: At this point the collaboration between primary school teachers and social workers in the Netherlands, Portugal and Sweden in general is very limited. Improving this collaboration is important according to us. In The Netherlands there is a shift in several the teacher training colleges. There are more interdisciplinary subjects integrated.

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  8. Interprofessional collaboration is very important, and we have very different experiences in the group. Inclusion is an important part of interprofessional collaboration. In Finland they have a three step system, is needs strong cooperation, also with the parents. The system has good points, but some lacks, the system is slow. It is a big challenge

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  9. At TMH in Rotterdam cooperating with other welfare takers is not really implemented officially. During the final internship they have to prove somehow to be able to communicate with welfare takers.
    Since a few years the aim of the government is Inclusive education, but due to not ebough budget and experience from regular teachers, this is quite a challange.

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  10. Room 15 question: our access to virtual meetings and conferences all over the world speeds up our acquisition of knowledge and (interdisciplinary) understanding. How do you see this emerging trend play a role in the future (of interprofessional cooperation)? What emerging trends for the future you see that might lead us to another era in our jobs?

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  11. Group: Luc, Sabine, Cathy, Ingmarie & Petra

    In Sweden the situation is more or less the same as in Denmark.
    Not sure if it’s is the same on the trust part.
    In Holland is also more or less the same.
    Belgium: social workers and pedagoges and nurses: number of students are rising enormously.
    Students choose welfare professions to “help” but the level of students is going down.
    In France there is a problem because less students choose to become teachers, there is a lack of teachers.
    Same in Belgium
    In Holland the lack of teachers is also a problem.

    Collaboration between different groups of people who work in wellfare professions.
    In Belgium this is part of the curriculum in the third year. Same in Holland.
    In primary schools in Holland and Belgium there are f.i. no social workers who are working in primary education.
    Sweden: in preschool already years ago collaboration between the various professions.
    In University as well collaboration.

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    • Belgium: more women than men, whenever there’s a career move (e.g. headteacher) there’s more men.

      France: The same kind of situation as in DK. There is a shift however nowadays until 1990 it was considered as a calling, now it’s regarded as a job.
      During lockdown parents recognised that teaching is a hard job.

      Belgium: it was a hard time for teachers and they got attacked by the public.

      DK: There is really an awareness created that teaching is a valuable.

      Is there a shift when going to bachelor and master? In Finland there’s a higher status since it’s on master level (5 years).
      In France there’s an exam that is much more important (Concours).
      Belgium

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  12. We found many similarities in our countries (Sweden, The Netherlands, and the United States) in terms of views within the Welfare Professions.
    We also noted that teachers are often reluctant to strike because strikes will hurt the children they teach. Consequently, the cycle continues that pay is low in teaching fields.
    In all our countries, we believe that female-dominated professions have less prestige with low pay.
    In some countries the salaries of nurses may increase due to the pandemic.
    We discussed that nurses have higher salary and prestige in the US and teachers have lower salaries and less prestige. It is the reverse in Sweden where teachers have higher prestige and salary than nurses.

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  13. – image/ vision: big change through the wish of a high lifestandard/ and a life that’s nice versus the money you really need

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  14. Gender: The situation is similar to Denmark in both Belgium, Czech Republic and Sweden. The smaller children the more females and vice versa
    The salary is quite meager in Czech Republic. In Sweden and Belgium the salary is ok, however, teachers in the field increase their salary faster and therefore sometimes have higher salaries after some years.
    The leadership in University in Czech Republic is dominated by males which is different from both Sweden and Belgium.
    In Sweden, Belgium and Czech Republic teachers can cooperate with different professionals when there is a need for that (e.g. psychiatry, councilors, school nurses, speech therapists etc.)

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  15. Group 11 (Holland, Belgium Denmark, Finland)
    most of the history is similar, the teacher used to be male and live in a big house next to the school, he was the ‘smart guy’ of the village with the same status as the doctor and the banker.

    On the interprofessional coorporation its a must for everyone to put this in the curricula.
    We need to learn about each others profession more to upgrade the collaboration

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  16. Conserning Gender: The situation is similar to Denmark in both Belgium, Czech Republic and Sweden. The smaller children the more females and vice versa
    The salary is quite meager in Czech Republic. In Sweden and Belgium the salary is ok, however, teachers in the field increase their salary faster and therefore sometimes have higher salaries after some years.
    The leadership in University in Czech Republic is dominated by males which is different from both Sweden and Belgium.
    In Sweden, Belgium and Czech Republic teachers can cooperate with different professionals when there is a need for that (e.g. psychiatry, councilors, school nurses, speech therapists etc.)

    Like

  17. Room 19: we were from Denmark and Sweden – and we discussed the differences esp. the current situation of the lack of teachers in Sweden – esp for pri-primary and primary. The discrepancy between what the ideals are for working with e.g. Kindergarten and the actual students and applicants and their possibilities. we also discussed the differences between the sexes in the teaching profession, esp pre-school teachers. 🙂

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  18. Group 11 (Holland, Belgium Denmark, Finland)
    most of the history is similar, the teacher used to be male and live in a big house next to the school, he was the ‘smart guy’ of the village with the same status as the doctor and the banker.

    On the interprofessional coorporation its a must for everyone to put this in the curricula.
    We need to learn about each others profession more to upgrade the collaboration

    Like

  19. 1. Belgium: more women than men, whenever there’s a career move (e.g. headteacher) there’s more men.

    France: The same kind of situation as in DK. There is a shift however nowadays until 1990 it was considered as a calling, now it’s regarded as a job.
    During lockdown parents recognised that teaching is a hard job.

    Belgium: it was a hard time for teachers and they got attacked by the public.

    DK: There is really an awareness created that teaching is a valuable.

    Is there a shift when going to bachelor and master? In Finland there’s a higher status since it’s on master level (5 years).
    In France there’s an exam that is much more important (Concours).
    Belgium

    Like

  20. Christoffer Sweden:
    “mall reflections, only small examples, not necessary representing the discussions of the Group or the situation in the countries (Sweden, Belgium, Tchech Republic, Lithuania, Austria)
    Different views on teaching, professionalism, knowledge, children etc can make collaboration a little bit tricky
    Other professions are “outside” the organization.
    Belgium: All schools are connected to a CLB center with social workers, nurses, doctors etc that are open to the children from the schools
    In Sweden the normal teacher work not often include collaboration with other professions. Most children more or less only meet teachers. Children with needs are of course facing collaboration between schools, social workers, nurses etc.
    In Tcech schools there is a psychologist working with the children, something that is never seen that spread in e.g British schools.”

    Like

  21. Small reflections, only small examples, not necessary representing the discussions of the Group or the situation in the countries (Sweden, Belgium, Tchech Republic, Lithuania, Austria)
    Different views on teaching, professionalism, knowledge, children etc can make collaboration a little bit tricky
    Other professions are “outside” the organization.
    Belgium: All schools are connected to a CLB center with social workers, nurses, doctors etc that are open to the children from the schools
    In Sweden the normal teacher work not often include collaboration with other professions. Most children more or less only meet teachers. Children with needs are of course facing collaboration between schools, social workers, nurses etc.
    In Tcech schools there is a psychologist working with the children, something that is never seen that spread in e.g British schools.

    Like

  22. 2. France: 10 years ago we worked with other professions. Up tot 1990 teachers were considered to be God, now we need help of other specialists.
    Infrastructure doesn’t invite to cooperate with the different specialists. Because everyone is on their own, in their own classroom.
    Why not think about structurally working with other sectors e.g. arts sector.

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  23. 3. It‘s not easy to work at the moment with other sectors because of money.
    Belgium: We don’t work together structurally with other sectors in our uni, there’s a 3 year training here and it takes too much.

    Like

  24. Philip O’Neill Artevelde UAS, Belgium to Everyone (2:43 PM)

    2. France: 10 years ago we worked with other professions. Up tot 1990 teachers were considered to be God, now we need help of other specialists.
    Infrastructure doesn’t invite to cooperate with the different specialists. Because everyone is on their own, in their own classroom.
    Why not think about structurally working with other sectors e.g. arts sector.

    Like

  25. Philip O’Neill Artevelde UAS, Belgium to Everyone (2:43 PM)

    3. It‘s not easy to work at the moment with other sectors because of money.
    Belgium: We don’t work together structurally with other sectors in our uni, there’s a 3 year training here and it takes too much.

    Like

  26. 4. Thinking out of the box would be a good suggestion and see how we can make things work.

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  27. Lena Almqvist Nielsen to Everyone (2:48 PM)
    Discussions from group 20
    In Japan, the number of elderly people has increased so we have many workers for the elderly people, but the workers get less money than expected. The number of people working in welfare professions is small. Money given to them should be higher since this is a big problem. Denmark and Scandinavian countries – it’s important to think of the welfare workers and respect their work.
    Belgium – we also have an increasing amount of elderly and there are not enough people working here and not enough respect for these professions.
    Norway – We have many women in my own professions abut the professors are mostly men.
    Now people are not trusted in their professions, as a teacher you are accountable for the quality for the assessment and teaching as people as in mind. As teachers you must write so many reports, everyone need to be accountable at all times. Professionals are not trusted anymore. Earlier teachers were respected for their knowledge. We start testing and assessing children at a ver

    Like

  28. Discussions from group 20
    In Japan, the number of elderly people has increased so we have many workers for the elderly people, but the workers get less money than expected. The number of people working in welfare professions is small. Money given to them should be higher since this is a big problem. Denmark and Scandinavian countries – it’s important to think of the welfare workers and respect their work.
    Belgium – we also have an increasing amount of elderly and there are not enough people working here and not enough respect for these professions.
    Norway – We have many women in my own professions abut the professors are mostly men.
    Now people are not trusted in their professions, as a teacher you are accountable for the quality for the assessment and teaching as people as in mind. As teachers you must write so many reports, everyone need to be accountable at all times. Professionals are not trusted anymore. Earlier teachers were respected for their knowledge. We start testing and assessing children at a ver

    Like

  29. Philip O’Neill Artevelde UAS, Belgium to Everyone (2:43 PM)
    1. Belgium: more women than men, whenever there’s a career move (e.g. headteacher) there’s more men.

    France: The same kind of situation as in DK. There is a shift however nowadays until 1990 it was considered as a calling, now it’s regarded as a job.
    During lockdown parents recognised that teaching is a hard job.

    Belgium: it was a hard time for teachers and they got attacked by the public.

    DK: There is really an awareness created that teaching is a valuable.

    Is there a shift when going to bachelor and master? In Finland there’s a higher status since it’s on master level (5 years).
    In France there’s an exam that is much more important (Concours).
    Belgium

    Like

  30. Peggy Gallagher, USA to Everyone (2:49 PM)
    Group 7: Denmark and USA discussed concern with term “welfare” professions. The term may be construed as derogatory to some. We also discussed the work that welfare professionals do as infrastructure for a country. It should be construed this way and may get more prestige.

    Like

  31. Dear all, thank you so much for all your valuable questions and comments!

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